How to make pole floats

how to make pole floats

How and when to use a pole float for catfish

Mar 29,  · POLE RIGS MADE EASY!!!! | HOW TO MAKE A POLE RIG AND SIMPLE FLOAT CHOICES | Rob Wootton Preparation is key in fishing and getting ready for the season ahead. Jul 21,  · Also remember that the shape of pole float bodies will have direct impact on shotting weight and length of tip and stem. If you decide to make the tip measurer/cutter, keep a notebook handy to jot the sizes down as to shape etc. of the float body to length of tip.

Login or Sign Up. Logging in Remember me. Log in. Forgot password or user name? How to make your own pole floats? Posts Latest Activity Photos. Page of 2. Filtered by:. Previous 1 2 template Next. I am not looking at making profit and am only doing it so I can tinker how to make pole floats different shapes and sizes etc for my needs.

This would also be something to do in my spare time with the satisfaction of catching a few fish on them. So what I would like to find out is: Step by step guide on what to do and what order to do things in? What tools would I need to make them?

How much do the materials cost? How long does it take to make a float? How hard are they to make? Any additional info that would help me would be very useful. Thanks in advance, Stephen. Tags: None. Hi mate when you get a minute call me on and i will help you with every bit of info you need to know. Comment Post Cancel. For what happens if you stop paying property taxes question I suggest you look at my website.

You need to obtain some very strong materials for carpfloats like; glassfibre, carbon, synthetic for floatbodies, coils or strong eyes from stainless steel. Most of these items you can order at Stonfo or at MCM through your local tackle shop.

For glue I would suggest Pattex profix PU. It holds materials very good. I have never had complaints of stems pulling loose! Varnish can be yachtpaint or better still the G8 from Vosschemie. We continentals use it with total satisfaction. You can make this hobby as expensive as you want, starting with a mini drill like a Dremel or Proxxon. To create the same floats over and over again a CNC lathe is best but very expensive! The shape of your floatbodies is digitally stored in a computer.

Not much! When you order your materials better ask your dealer for prices. I can create about two or three in an hour. At first you how to finish monster carnival to get some experience so in the beginning a few floats may not become what you had in mind. But it is great fun to do and nothing compares your feeling of satisfaction when you catch your first fish with them.

Cheers guys. What is the best way to create the body's for floats? What size balsa would you start with to do this? Roha i will try my best to understand as much as i can though still hard in some areas to see whats going on even via a web page translater. Originally posted by ackoo View Post. I also asked the same questions a while ago. Roha was very helpful and informative. His floats are beautifully finished too.

He said to me that there are no secrets regarding float making as far as he is concerned, and any questions to him will be answered fully and honestly. This was very true. Hope you are keeping well Roha, did you finally get your new lathe? Regards, Roachman. Roha uses a profiling system on his lathe, how to make pole floats goes a very long way to get consistent float bodies. Originally posted by Roachman View Post. Last edited by Roha ; 28 AugustPM.

Hi there, I receive some messages with questions about the materials I use and where they are available. For bigger orders of stainless steel wire, carbon, coils spring eyes or fibre you can order them at MCM and Stonfo Through your local tackledealer. Smaller amounts I order at; Panier d'achat - Flotteur au Coup This site has almost everything you need for making your own floats. Pole floats as well as wagglers.

Even a lathe and gear to center your stems and bristles are there. The synthetic for my floatbody's is called Rohacell. This material i've been using for over 20 years now and I still have floats from this material I made in the beginning. It's very durable, lighter than balsa, stronger too and it does'nt take in water. It is resistant to all kind of chemicals so you even can apply superglue on it. This is almost as hard as oakwood and harder to shape with sandingpaper Floats made of Rohacell will last much longer than balsa floats.

No wonder the commercial float buisiness is not eager to make floats from this material. After some time anglers would'nt buy floats anymore because the onces they already have will last and last Normally This material is being used in aerospace and radar technology. For further specifications see this site; performanceplastics My forum name is Roha Ro nald Ha mmers It's a coincidence the Rohacell brandname looks like my name.

Many floatmakers may have them. Mostly because, like me, they have spent many hours and lots of money in their surch for processing good quality floats. Some of them try to make a living out of it.

I don't blame them for keeping things to themselves. For me it's only a hobby. My Belgian Friend Ludo and I give demonstrations at the Expo tackle trade fair in Belgium to show people how to create their own floats. We have no secrets at all. Why would we? I think its fantastic other floatmakers having thesame pleasure as we have in float making. Last edited by Roha ; 29 AugustPM. The questions i want to ask is in your opinions: is it best to paint the tips or do you prefer to how to find santa claus on christmas eve them.

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Why should you use a pole float?

Nov 11,  · If you want to create floats with very centric holes for the stems and bristles you’d better get a mini lathe. To create the same floats over and over again a CNC lathe is best (but very expensive!) The shape of your floatbodies is digitally stored in a computer. You’ll need sandingpaper as wel if you want to create a float by hand. hand made pole floats. i have been making floats since i was i was taught by my famous uncle mervyn (topper) haskins firstly making the traditional balsa on crow quill avons then the styrofoam poly avons. i have lost count at the amount i have made selling them to as far away as denmark,ireland,germany,france to name a few.. for the last 5 years i have had to change to pole floats . Our pole float bodies are produced on a small custom built lathe designed and built by Gaz himself. We now only use synthetic foams in the production of floats as consistent quality balsa is becoming hard to obtain, in any case the foams we use are stronger and much more consistent.

Dusty Titan 4x10 red. Lots of thought, care and attention goes into Malman Floats. Here is some insight into the production and materials that go into our floats. Our pole float bodies are produced on a small custom built lathe designed and built by Gaz himself. We now only use synthetic foams in the production of floats as consistent quality balsa is becoming hard to obtain, in any case the foams we use are stronger and much more consistent.

Two types of foam are used, both are used in high spec military and aerospace industry, both have the highest strength to weight ratio of any foamed polymer on the planet, not to be confused with the cheap polyurethane or dyvinicell h foam bodies found on 'handmades' available on popular auction sites our foam is 3 to 4 times stronger at the same density. There is nothing better. SL super light foam is slightly lighter than the lightest balsa around at 71kg m3 meaning small body size and less resistance in the water.

However it is as strong as a hard balsa meaning it lacks the very low strength of very light balsa. B-Foam has the same density as a light balsa at kg m3 yet has extreme strength in comparison, approximately 3 times harder.

This means floats can be made to work the same way a balsa float would but with big improvements in side eye strength and damage resistance. We use a combination of hollow plastic and solid glass tips on our floats. Hollow tips are useful for a wide variety of situations and are especially good for 'dotting down'. However there are times when hollows just will not cut it in terms of sensitivity, this is when glass comes into play.

Glass is narrower meaning less of the 'Archimedes' effect and it is also denser than water meaning once a fish has moved the float there is some downward inertia which 'amplifies' the bite, its also very bright for its diameter.

We use glass and wire in all our floats. Glass is great when strength is needed and is virtually indestructible, it also allows for through body construction of floats greatly adding strength and allowing the use of 'Perfect Power' eyes. Wire is useful for a number of reasons.

Firstly it can be used to make a float cock quickly, great for dibbers and f1 floats. Secondly it can be used to reduce the amount of shot needed down the line, really useful for hard fished carp that need to see a bait fall naturally and can feel bigger shot when they pick up the bait, a float taking 4x10 shot down the line can be used in 6ft of water in good conditions. All our eyes are made in house to ensure correct specification.

Most other float makers buy eyes in but we have found that the hard grade of stainless steel used in mass produced side eyes contributes to eyes being prone to pulling, there's no 'give' in them.

Most eye pulls are caused by sudden realise of pressure, a hard material only amplifies this effect. We use a softer grade of stainless to give some flex in the stem of the eye, it means we have to spend extra time pre-drilling the hole for the eye but its worth it.

On slim floats that have little body material to hold the eye in place we secure the eye further with silk thread, as far as we're aware we are the only ones doing this. Nothing holds an eye better on light floats. The stem of the eye is placed in the opposite side of the float and then the wire wraps around the stem underneath the tip. Put simply they are the same weight as a normal side eye, so no effect on balance, they twist into a loop as a normal side eye so no line damage but they are stronger than a spring eye.

Open up a copy of your favourite magazine and try and find a top match angler using floats with springs. We have spent years developing what we believe to be the perfect finish.

Hard shell like acrylic and celulose paints found on many commercial floats seem to be prone to failure but they have to use them to protect soft balsa.

Due to the hard nature of our foams we have no need to use rock hard paints to protect soft low quality balsa so we can use flexible polyurethane and polyvinyl paints and varnishes which don't crack and are much more resistant to the odd knock. All floats are dip painted, brush coating doesn't cut it, it leaves too much paint on the body effecting weight. Mobile Site. Your basket is empty. Change Currency: GBP. Bodies Our pole float bodies are produced on a small custom built lathe designed and built by Gaz himself.

There is nothing better SL super light foam is slightly lighter than the lightest balsa around at 71kg m3 meaning small body size and less resistance in the water. Tips We use a combination of hollow plastic and solid glass tips on our floats. Stems We use glass and wire in all our floats. Eyes All our eyes are made in house to ensure correct specification. Finish We have spent years developing what we believe to be the perfect finish.

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