How to make a web quest

how to make a web quest

Creating a WebQuest | It's Easier Than You Think

Make it crisp and clean and you should be on your way to a well-designed webquest that is both fun and educational for all. Click on the "Process" button to learn how to create your own webquest. Process. Sign up for a free account. Once that is completed, you will be guided to a page where you can easily create your WebQuest using a basic interface (text formatting editor) similar to what you would find in any email or word-processing program. After creating your WebQuest, you can preview and save it.

June 17, This year marks the 20th anniversary of the WebQuest model. Watch this space for announcements of some new resources coming later this summer! October what times does breakfast end at mcdonalds, WebQuests and Web 2. This webinar conducted by the Male Education Network features a discussion about how blogs and wikis fit into the WebQuest model.

You can view the archive here. Please report bad links and suggest additions and improvements to the site by writing to Bernie Dodge, PhD. Technologically, creating a WebQuest can be very simple. As long as you can create a document with hyperlinks, you can create a WebQuest.

If you're going to call it a WebQuest, though, be sure that it has all the critical attributes. To make it easier to create great WebQuests without having to master a web editor, QuestGarden was created by Bernie Dodge.

QuestGarden provides step-by-step quet and examples. Hosting is provided, and you can also download a zipped archive of your lesson and move it to another server. Subscribers can also start with an existing WebQuest created by one of QuestGarden's members and modify it easily to meet their needs.

You can find more information here and enter the site here. The old-school way of creating a WebQuest is to download a template that includes prompts for each section, open it up in a web editor, write your heart out, save it and then upload it to a server somewhere. Lots of effort on purely tech-y things required, and that effort often displaces the time needed to create good pedagogy. Still, if you already know how to wwb Dreamweaver or KompoZertemplates are the way to go.

Here are some sources:. You might find some very old ish templates out there like this that have separate sections for Resources quwst Learning Advice. My advice: don't use these. A decade of experience has shown us that those things are much better sprinkled within the Process section.

Once you have a tk you like, just follow the steps in the WebQuest Design Process. Contact Please report bad links and suggest additions and improvements to the site by hwo to Bernie Dodge, PhD. A real WebQuest This includes synthesis, analysis, problem-solving, creativity and judgment. A WebQuest that isn't based on real resources from the web is probably just a traditional lesson in disguise.

Of course, books and other media can be used x a WebQuest, but if the web qeust at the heart of the lesson, it's not a Qhest. Having learners simply distilling web sites and making a qkest about them isn't enough. Having learners go look at this page, then go play this game, then go here and turn your name into hieroglyphs doesn't require higher level thinking skills and so, by definition, isn't a WebQuest.

Sample product: Colonial America WebQuest Templates The old-school way of creating a WebQuest is to download a template that includes prompts for each section, open it up in a web editor, write your heart out, save it and then upload it to a server somewhere. Here are some sources: The original what is in xenadrine ultra template Classic framed templates from SDSU Templates by Dan Schellenberg from the University of Regina t modern, using css and xhtml You might find some very old ish templates out there like this that have separate sections for Resources and Learning Advice.

Online tool for creating simple WebQuests, especially appropriate for younger elementary students. Sample product: Colonial America.

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The old-school way of creating a WebQuest is to download a template that includes prompts for each section, open it up in a web editor, write your heart out, save it and then upload it to a server somewhere. Lots of effort on purely tech-y things required, and that effort often displaces the time needed to create good pedagogy.

To create this article, 14 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. This article has been viewed 32, times. Learn more A WebQuest is a computer based teaching tool that allows students to work in groups or independently. Students use the web to find information on a specific topic presented by the WebQuest.

A WebQuest asks students to use higher order thinking skills and solve a problem that you put before them. It teaches them how to evaluate information and how to use the web for something other than YouTube clips of turtles eating tomatoes. Get started with Step 1 below to learn how to make one yourself! To format your WebQuest, start with a title page that includes the title of the quest and your name.

Then, make an introduction page that introduces students to the assignment. Next, make task and process pages that outline what the objective is and what students need to do. After that, add a resources page that identifies all the sources students can use, followed by an evaluation page with a rubric. Finally, make a conclusion page that summarizes what students should have learned. To learn how to make your WebQuest fun and engaging, scroll down!

Did this summary help you? Yes No. Log in Social login does not work in incognito and private browsers. Please log in with your username or email to continue. No account yet? Create an account. Edit this Article. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. By using our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Cookie Settings. Learn why people trust wikiHow. Download Article Explore this Article parts. Tips and Warnings. Related Articles. Article Summary. Author Info Last Updated: September 3, Part 1 of Make the Title page.

You can choose from a number of formats website, Power Point, Google Doc, Word Doc, printed worksheet, etc but you should generally always have a title page. This sets the tone for the assignment and makes it look more professional. The Title page just shows the title of the quest and your name.

Give it an interesting title! Make the Introduction page. The introduction will Usually it introduces the concepts dealt with in the assignment. Many times a WebQuest will have a bit of a story that goes with it, and the introduction can serve to tell the story and give a summarized, basic description of what the student is supposed to learn.

Make the Task page. The Task page clearly states what the student needs to learn by the end of the assignment. Remember: the goal of the question, this learning journey, is the knowledge they come out with at the end.

Use this knowledge goal to create the "story" of the quest your students will be sent on. The official Webquest site lists a variety of Task types which each serve a different education purpose. Make the Process page. The Process page clearly outlines what the student needs to do and in what order the tasks need to be done. Be as clear as you can: the idea is that the student can do the assignment perfectly without you needing to give them any more explanation.

Make the Resources page. The Resources page gives the students a direct map to all of the sources of information they can use. This means you'll need to identify sources for the information you want them to learn.

Get good at using a search engine and learn how to use keywords and boolean properties to find the information you want. Make the Evaluation page. The Evaluation page contains a rubric, so the students know exactly what you're looking for from them and what they need to do to get a good grade.

Make the Conclusion page. The conclusion page wraps up the assignment, goes over the sorts of things that your students should have learned, and encourages them to learn more. You may wish to include more sources for them to do some extra learning and research if they're interested or finish early.

Part 2 of Choose a format. The old school method of making Webquests was a Word document with hyperlinks or a basic html webpage. If you don't want to go through the pain and heartbreak of making your own website, there are templates or you can use other mediums to present the same information. A Google Doc or Spreadsheet can give your students what they need without putting so much of a burden on you. Make the task engaging. The task itself should be interesting.

Get creative! The word "quest" is in the title for a reason. Give the task a sense of mystery and your students a sense of purpose. Add in duds. First, give a primer on citations, evidence, logic, bias, and things like peer review, so that they can learn to evaluate resources.

Then, let your students know that one resource that you give them is a dud and contains bad information. Choose a dud website that looks as convincing as possible. This will let them practice those skills. Choose the right kind of websites and resources. You want to set a good example for your students, by showing them quality websites and teaching them how to evaluate information on the web. Look for age appropriate material but also look for reputable sources, citations, and current information.

Help your students to question the material. You don't want to just spoon-feed your students the information that they need. You also don't want to give them just one side of the issue. Let them see lots of different information and teach them how to evaluate and decide what's right and wrong.

Put kids in teams whenever you can. By putting students into teams, they'll not only learn how to work with others to complete tasks, but they can also cause each other to think more and discuss the validity of information they find on the web.

Don't be limited to the web. While websites are the main point with WebQuests, don't feel limited to this kind of resource. Add is other materials like handouts, books, magazines, or even peer-reviewed journals if your students are in high school. Make use of experts. Inquire with experts from local universities and see if they'd be willing to email responses to set questions from students.

They will usually be happy to write up a standard response that can quickly be sent in response to basic questions and your students will earn the confidence to contact experts who can advise them.

Make the evaluation clear. When you write the rubric or evaluation page, make sure that it is completely clear. You want your students to be able to do well, not suffer because the instructions were ambiguous or unclear. Make a fun conclusion. Conclusions can be kind of boring This is a great way to reward your students for finishing early or being curious enough to do more learning on their own. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube.

You will want to select a topic that asks students to use higher level thinking skills. Don't just pick a topic that asks your students to do something they could do without the Web or computer. Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0. The WebQuest site has a lot of tips and advice for creating a WebQuest.

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