How to edit svg images

how to edit svg images

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By converting an SVG image or icon to an Office shape you can disassemble the SVG file and edit individual pieces of it. Converting the file is quite easy; just right-click the SVG image in your document, workbook, or presentation and select Convert to shape from the context menu that appears. wooustoday.com file IS a source file. It isn't layers in the Photoshop/Gimp sense but it absolutely can be picked apart. Use an SVG editor - that would be Illustrator or Inkscape. Alternatively, if you want to get real crazy you can open wooustoday.com in any text editor and look for the values you want to change which for colors would be in Hex format #nnnnnn.

If you want to work with the SVG image I've used in this tutorial, follow the steps and diagram below to download it. Rename it to happy. We will explore six different methods in this tutorial. This method is the simplest way to add SVG images to a webpage. Assuming you downloaded the SVG image from unDraw and renamed it to happy.

For instance, in the demo above, I didn't modify the size of the SVG image, so it assumed its original size which was a width of Note: to change the original size, you have to specify the width and height with CSS as you can see in the demo below.

You can also update the original width and height directly. Still, it allows a bit more customization. You use the data attribute to specify the URL of the resource that you'll use by the object, which is the SVG image in our case. Keep in mind, however, that this method has limitations, too.

According to MDN, most modern browsers have deprecated and removed support for browser plug-ins. This will hopefully guide you towards choosing the right method when adding SVG images to a website. If you have any questions, you can send me a message on Twitterand I'll be happy to answer every single one. I am a software developer who is passionate about technical writing, contributing to open source organizations and building developer communities.

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Why should you use SVG images? There are a number of reasons to use SVG images, some of which are: SVG images do not lose their quality when zoomed or resized. They can be created and edited with an IDE or text editor. They are accessible and animatable. They have a small file size and are highly scalable.

And they can be searched, indexed, scripted, and compressed. Now let's see how you can actually work with SVG images. How to download the SVG image used in this tutorial If you want to work with the SVG image I've used how to make a volcano paper mache model this tutorial, follow the steps and diagram below to download it. Go to unDraw. Change the background color to yellow.

In the search box, search for the word happy. Click on the image named Happy news. On the pop-up window, click on the Download SVG how to stay focused when reading your projects button.

If you followed the steps above correctly, the SVG image should be on your computer now. If you did everything correctly, your webpage should look exactly like the demo below.

Check out the demo below and feel free to make modifications to it using CSS. You use the width and height to specify the size of the SVG image. Again, below is a demo for you to explore.

Edidiong Asikpo I am a software developer who is passionate about technical writing, contributing to open source organizations and building developer communities.

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Jun 20,  · How to edit a vector or SVG image using inkscape - Free vector graphics wooustoday.comr wooustoday.com inkscape here wooustoday.com

SVG files in your documents, presentations, emails, and workbooks. This feature is available only to Microsoft Subscribers for Windows desktop clients. Tip: SVG is an open standard that was established in There are several things you can do to customize how your SVG image looks in your document. To access those tools click on your SVG image and a contextual Format tab should appear on the Ribbon.

Let's take a look at some of the more useful options the Format tab offers you. Change Graphic - This lets you select a different image to replace the current image with.

Graphics Styles - These are the primary tools for editing the appearance of your image. The gallery contains a collection of pre-defined styles for converting your image to a line drawing or changing the fill color of it. In the example below I've inserted a logo of a bicycle and the original is all black. In the Styles Gallery I've selected a preset that has a black outline and a light blue fill to match my company theme. Tip: Hover your mouse over each graphics style in the gallery to see what your image would look like if you chose that style.

It's just a preview; the changes won't take effect unless you actually click on that style. If you want to change the color of your image and none of the styles in the gallery are quite what you want, Graphics Fill lets you choose from hundreds of colors. Whatever color you choose is going to apply to the entire image. In the example below I've selected our bicycle logo and applied a red fill to it.

Note: If you want to fill individual parts of the SVG image with different colors you'll need to convert it to a shape first. See below for instructions on how to do that. The Eyedropper is a particularly interesting tool. When you choose it from the menu it changes your cursor to an eyedropper accompanied by a small box. Point the eyedropper at any object in your document, on your slide, or worksheet and the small box will fill with the color of that object.

Click your left mouse button to acknowledge and your selected SVG shape will be filled with that color. It's a great way to quickly match the color of your shape with the color of another item you have such as a company logo. And yes, it works with colors in inserted photographs too. This lets you set the color of the border surrounding your image. The eyedropper tool described above works here too. Looking to give your SVG images a little extra style?

Graphics Effects helps you add drop shadows, glows, 3D effects and more to your images. In the example below I've selected a perspective shadow to make my image appear a bit more three-dimensional.

Arrange - This group contains the tools you're probably familiar with if you've worked with other image formats in Office. You can use the Bring Forward or Send Backward tools to layer your image on the page. This is handy if you want to place other objects in front of or behind your image. The Selection Pane tool makes it a little easier to select specific items on a complex page.

Align makes it easier to place your selected image along the left edge, in the middle or at other known places on the page. If you have multiple images that you'd like to treat as a single object, select the first object, hold down the CTRL key and select each of the other objects, then click Group. The Rotate command makes it easy to rotate your image, or flip it vertically or horizontally. Size - These are tools for cropping or resizing your image.

For details on how to use the Crop tool see Crop a picture. Note: This feature is only available for Microsoft subscribers using Office desktop applications on Windows or Mac. Converting the file is quite easy; just right-click the SVG image in your document, workbook, or presentation and select Convert to shape from the context menu that appears.

Let's take a look at some of the more useful options the Graphic Format tab offers you. Graphics Styles - The gallery contains a collection of pre-defined styles for converting your image to a line drawing or changing the fill color of it.

In the Styles Gallery I've selected a preset that has a light blue fill to match my company theme. The Format Pane opens a pane that gives you easy access to the tools to modify this image. To get started tap the SVG image you want to edit and you should see the Graphics tab appear on the ribbon. Graphics Styles - These are a set of predefined styles you can add to quickly change the look of your SVG file. Currently you'll need to open your document in Office for Microsoft on Windows to do that.

Wrap Text helps you to control how text will flow around your image in the document. If you want to stack multiple objects on top of each other Arrange lets you move the selected image up or down forward or backwards in the stack. Use the Crop tool if you only want a portion of your SVG image. With the image selected, tap Crop then drag the box to frame the image the way you want it. When you're done, tap Crop. Tip: If you want to undo your cropping, tap the image, select Crop again and then tap Reset from the context menu that appears.

Use the Alt Text tool to give your image a text description for people who are using screen readers to read your document. Note: If you don't see the ribbon, tap the Edit icon. Styles - These are a set of predefined styles you can add to quickly change the look of your SVG file. If you want to change the color of your image and none of the styles in the gallery are quite what you want, Fill lets you choose from hundreds of colors.

To change or remove the line around your SVG image choose Outline. Size and Position let's you specify how large your SVG image should be on the page.

You also have some editing tools available for SVG images. In Windows Mobile apps it appears as a gallery on the left end of the Graphics ribbon. If you want to stack multiple objects on top of each other Forward or Backward lets you move the selected image up or down in the stack. Note that you have to have Wrap Text set to something other than In line with text for these buttons to be enabled.

To rotate your SVG image use the rotate handle that appears above your image when it's selected. Click and drag the handle around the image to rotate. If you want to just quickly rotate 90 degrees, or flip vertically or horizontally, use the Rotate command on the ribbon. See How do I give feedback on Microsoft Office? This article was last updated on December 5th, as a result of your comments.

If you found it helpful, and especially if you didn't, please use the feedback controls below to let us know how we can make it better. Insert pictures. Insert icons. Animate pictures, clip art, text, and other objects.

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